Forum technique de RadioProtection Cirkus

Le portail de la RadioProtection pratique et opérationnelle - www.rpcirkus.org
 
RP CirkusRP Cirkus  AccueilAccueil  FAQFAQ  RechercherRechercher  S'enregistrerS'enregistrer  Connexion  
Partagez | 
 

 Impact sanitaire

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
Aller à la page : Précédent  1 ... 12 ... 21, 22, 23, 24, 25  Suivant
AuteurMessage
Invité
Invité



MessageSujet: Re: Impact sanitaire   Dim 21 Aoû 2011 - 17:40

d'accord...
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Invité
Invité



MessageSujet: Re: Impact sanitaire   Mer 24 Aoû 2011 - 20:27

ruth a écrit:
à baldaquin ou à ceux qui savent : qu'est ce que le " camion" ( que contient il, quelles mesures ).

Bonsoir ruth,

Désolé d'avoir tardé à répondre.

Je faisais référence au camion d'anthroporadiamétrie, dont vous trouverez un exemple et des illustrations ici .



lombardo andaluz a écrit:
Jansson-Guilcher a écrit:

L'énergie est proportionnelle à la fréquence suivant la loi E=hv où v est la fréquence et h, une constante (qui vaut environ 6,5.10exp-34 J.s).
Oui, la constante de Planck h qui lie la fréquence de toute onde à l'énergie électromagnétique qu'elle transporte.



Attention à l'utilisation du terme fréquence, qui a occasionné un long aparté entre JG et moi :

Je ne suis pas du tout d'accord pour relier la formule E=hv, où v est la fréquence spatiale de l'onde électromagnétique et la fréquence d'irradiation de la cellule, qui est une fréquence temporelle d'émission, représentée par l'activité.



Pour permettre un éventuel débat sur les difficultés de la vulgarisation en radioprotection sans dévier ce topic de son sujet, j'ai créé un autre topic pour ceux qui le souhaitent.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
jsp
Acrobate
Acrobate



MessageSujet: Re: Impact sanitaire   Mer 24 Aoû 2011 - 20:51

http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/fl20110821x2.html

In the early hours of March 28, 1979, human errors and mechanical failures combined to cause a cooling system to stop working at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Generating Station near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. One of the station's two nuclear cores overheated, thrusting the plant into a crisis that would rivet public attention for five excruciating days.

Some 200 km away, at the headquarters of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in Washington, D.C., 36-year-old lawyer Peter Bradford suddenly found himself facing a critical double test.

First, would he and the four other commissioners who headed the government agency charged with ensuring nuclear safety be able to rein in the worst nuclear accident at a commercial reactor America had ever seen? And second, would it be able to do so while keeping the process transparent — as U.S. Freedom of Information laws required?

They are the same key tests that officials at Japan's nuclear watchdog agencies have faced since multiple reactors at the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant suffered meltdowns following the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11.

In some ways, the results have been similar as well.

In both cases, scholars, activists and politicians have questioned how ready government agencies were for a major accident — as well as how effectively they protected the public.

In both cases, the responsible agencies had difficulty providing accurate real-time information about what was going on at the plants and within the government.

Journalists who covered the Three Mile Island accident described information coming from the NRC, plant operator the Metropolitan Edison Company and the state government at the time as "chaotic," "confusing" and "contradictory" — just as journalists described the situation in Japan three decades later (although here, information may have been deliberately withheld).

But in the aftermath of the Three Mile Island accident, citizens, journalists and politicians had one key resource whose equivalent their counterparts in Japan will have to do without: transcripts of the discussions between Bradford and his fellow NRC commissioners as they struggled to handle the crisis.

During the crucial first two weeks of the still-ongoing Fukushima disaster, transcripts were not made of similar key exchanges.

However, ensuring that the mid-crisis meetings were recorded wasn't easy, Bradford said.

The 1976 U.S. Government in the Sunshine Act requires meetings at government agencies be open to the public if and when there are enough high-level agency members present to make a binding decision — and as long as the meeting does not fall into one of 10 exempt categories.

Most NRC decisions are made by five commissioners, which means that any time three or more of them meet they have decision-making power, and so the gathering falls under the Sunshine Act.

Until the Three Mile Island accident, holding open meetings hadn't been a logistical problem. But with a crisis in full swing, commissioners camped out at NRC headquarters and held impromptu gatherings around the clock.

"It didn't seem feasible to do that in public, so NRC staff took to wandering around with tape recorders, and whenever a third commissioner joined a conversation between two others, they'd start recording," Bradford recalled. That fulfilled the legal requirement.

Once the crisis was under control, the transcripts were reviewed to make sure there was no basis for withholding them. Shortly thereafter, they were handed over to congressional committees that had demanded them; one congressman quickly flipped the transcripts to the media.

So, although they hadn't assisted mid-crisis reporting — and Bradford said that the knowledge he was being taped didn't alter his actions — the transcripts became an important source for later reporting and for the presidential commission charged with assessing the NRC's disaster response.

"The transcripts were like the black box in an airplane crash. They were a treasure trove for reporters in terms of how much the NRC didn't know (during the crisis)," Bradford said. Prime among those unknowns was the fact that part of the core had melted on March 28.

"Trying to convince people we really didn't know (it had melted) would have been very hard (without the tapes)," he said.

The tapes did spark a few media emergencies. In one case, Bradford recalled, a transcript revealed that a staff member said, "I don't know why people are sitting around waiting to die." This was soon headline-material — until the tapes made clear that "decide" had been mis-typed as "die" during the transcription process.

In another instance, the chairman lamented that, "we're like a couple of blind people staggering around making decisions." An outraged letter soon arrived from the national association representing blind people, accusing the chairman of "gross insensitivity."

Overall, however, Bradford believes the tapes proved a boon to the NRC despite the many serious problems they revealed. "There was no sign of any coverup, so they damped down paranoia. I think those tapes saved nuclear power (in the United States)," he said.

In Japan, scholars may one day find the mirror-image of that statement to be true.

On March 30, almost three weeks after the Fukushima disaster began, Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano revealed that no transcripts had been made at critical early joint meetings between the utility's operator, Tokyo Electric Power Company (Tepco), the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA), the Nuclear Safety Commission (NSC) and the Ministry of Education. The reason, he said, was that information was being exchanged continuously as needed, rather than at formal meetings.

"In Japan, the degree of importance of a particular exchange of information isn't the basis for deciding whether to record it or not," explained Yukiko Miki, chair of Information Clearinghouse Japan, a nonprofit organization working to expand the government's information disclosure.

While laws do require important decisions to be recorded, until this spring the requirements for recording the discussions leading up to those decisions depended on the formality and legal standing of the meeting where the discussion took place.

For instance, a formal deliberative council meeting would require transcripts, while an impromptu but equally important mid-crisis chat might not. Practices varied widely across agencies.

Not only were many of the joint nuclear disaster meetings informal, but on May 6 Edano said their legal standing was also unclear. He described the joint headquarters as a "practical organization" — rather than a legal entity; according to Miki, this may locate it beyond the reach of Japan's freedom of information laws.

A new Record Management Law that took effect this April not only makes recording requirements uniform at all government agencies but also ensures that, when important questions are being decided, the whole process is recorded. The law may make record-less meetings like those that took place post-Fukushima illegal in the future, but in March it had not come into force.

Without those early records, not only reporters and citizens, but also the committee set up by the government to investigate the accident, face problems in uncovering who is ultimately responsible for the massive human, economic, and environmental losses stemming from the meltdowns.

"Were there problems in the decision-making process? What was known and not known? You can hold hearings (after the fact), but if there are no transcripts, it's hard to investigate objectively," said Miki.

Her organization is planning a project to formally request and archive all governmental records that do exist relating to the Fukushima accident. In doing so, the group will make use of the Information Disclosure Law that came into force in 2001 — with a revised version currently awaiting adoption by the Diet.

But Masaru Kaneko, an economics professor at Keio University in Tokyo, who is a frequent critic of Japan's public policy, doubts whether Miki's strategy will lead to the release of much new information — and not just because existing laws allow information requests to be denied for a wide variety of reasons.

"Japan's Freedom of Information laws exist within long-established political and administrative systems, so they don't function properly. At the center of power are the very people who don't want the information to come out," he said.

In fact, the disaster has so far implicated not only the nuclear industry but also politicians, academics and even supposed watchdog agencies that worked together to promote nuclear reactors as safe, cheap power sources.

"The core (of those corrupt relationships) has been exposed," Kaneko said. Miki, too, said information-disclosure problems have as much to do with the internal culture of government agencies as with the law.

"When information is released, there are all sorts of reactions and criticisms. Release is a risk for the government. Their basic position is antidisclosure," she said.

As the official Japanese inquiry into the Fukushima accident continues, the consequences of that deeply entrenched attitude are set to play out on a very high-profile stage.

"We're going to see what it's like when government agencies aren't able to prove they were acting in good faith," said Bradford.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
jsp
Acrobate
Acrobate



MessageSujet: Re: Impact sanitaire   Mer 24 Aoû 2011 - 20:56

Dans la presse japonaise, il est reproché aussi d'avoir détruit des enregistrements de témoignages de professeurs et d'élèves sur les événements de mars (en particulier l'évacuation).
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
jsp
Acrobate
Acrobate



MessageSujet: Re: Impact sanitaire   Mer 24 Aoû 2011 - 21:10

http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/dy/national/T110823005568.htm

plus exactement, ne pas avoir gardé les notes originales prises ou les enregistrements avant résumé ou rapport (tel que décrit en fin d'article ci-dessus)
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Invité
Invité



MessageSujet: Re: Impact sanitaire   Mer 24 Aoû 2011 - 21:29

merci balda, la doc est trés claire.
question bête : est ce l'examen de " choix" pour mesurer la radioactivité " déposée " dans le corps ( je ne connais pas les termes spécifiques : incorporée ?) est ce le " gold standard " ?
cout important , je présume ?
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Invité
Invité



MessageSujet: Re: Impact sanitaire   Mer 24 Aoû 2011 - 22:25

Coût : je n'en sais rien, tant pour le camion que pour un examen.
Gold Standard : je dirai oui et le terme me semble particulièrement approprié :
en calibrant l'appareil avec des fantômes anthropomorphiques et des activités connues, ils peuvent corriger ce qui est détecté dans les cas réels, et donc estimer au mieux l'activité fixée et en déduire une fourchette de dose.

Je suis sûr que plusieurs klowns sauront préciser cela.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Niko
Homme-canon
Homme-canon



MessageSujet: Re: Impact sanitaire   Lun 29 Aoû 2011 - 15:03

Ca y est la synthèse de l'accident est arrivée!

Vous pouvez la retrouver sur le site dans la section : "Documentation/Public et environnement"!
Merci à ses rédacteurs
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
http://www.rpcirkus.org/
jsp
Acrobate
Acrobate



MessageSujet: Re: Impact sanitaire   Lun 29 Aoû 2011 - 20:30

merci aux rédacteurs de la synthèse
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Invité
Invité



MessageSujet: Re: Impact sanitaire   Dim 25 Sep 2011 - 11:53

Bonjour,

ce n'était pas signalé sur ce fil, mais la page d'accueil RPC renvoie à deux chapitres très complets de discussion sur les risques sanitaires, avec des calculs très complets. A lire absolument, et merci à ceux qui l'ont posté (et à l'auteur!).

http://www.rpcirkus.org/documentation/environnement-public/754-radiation-risk-after-fukushima

PG
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Invité
Invité



MessageSujet: Re: Impact sanitaire   Dim 25 Sep 2011 - 19:22

Bonsoir
Mais oui c'est une de mes collègues, japonaise, qui m'a demandé si nous pouvions herberger ses documents.
Après quelques vérifications et suggestions de modifications de forme de ma part, nous avons bien entendu, dit oui !
Je transmettrai les remerciements.
KLOUG Maître Loyal du Cirkus
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Invité
Invité



MessageSujet: Re: Impact sanitaire   Dim 25 Sep 2011 - 20:32

Et tant que vous y êtes, cher maître, aussi mes excuses plates pour l'accès de machisme! Et j'ai pas d'excuses, avec deux de mes copains japonais qui sont des copines, prénommées Yukiko et Asako, avec "o" à la fin itou...

PG
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Nico
Trapéziste
Trapéziste



MessageSujet: Re: Impact sanitaire   Lun 26 Sep 2011 - 12:31

Pour répondre au message de Ruth du 24 août (mais non suis pas à la bourre) et à la réponse de Balda :
Coût de la mesure : aucune idée, désolé,
Gold Standard : oui, mais exclusivement pour les radionucléides émetteurs gamma, puisque les détecteurs du camion ne font que de la spectrométrie gamma. Pour d'autres radionucléides (par exemple le strontium 90 ou le tritium, émetteurs bêta pur), il faut faire des analyses radiotoxicologiques sur des prélèvements de selles ou d'urine.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
jsp
Acrobate
Acrobate



MessageSujet: Re: Impact sanitaire   Mar 4 Oct 2011 - 23:09

http://mdn.mainichi.jp/mdnnews/news/20111004p2g00m0dm116000c.html

NAGANO (Kyodo) -- Hormonal and other irregularities were detected in the thyroid glands of 10 out of 130 children evacuated from Fukushima Prefecture
Les enfants originaires de Fukushima qui résidaient près de Nagano ont été testés en août. (sang et urine)

"At present, we cannot say the children are ill but they require long-term observation," said Minoru Kamata, chief of the foundation. No clear link has been established between the children's condition and the radiation from the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.

commentaire : qu'aurait-on sur un échantillon de 130 enfants "tout-venants"?
quand on fait des recherches -alors qu'on n'a pas de signe d'appel-quelle est la proportion d'anomalies que l'on découvre?
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
AimelleB
Trapéziste
Trapéziste



MessageSujet: Re: Impact sanitaire   Mar 4 Oct 2011 - 23:27

jsp a écrit:
commentaire : qu'aurait-on sur un échantillon de 130 enfants "tout-venants"?
quand on fait des recherches -alors qu'on n'a pas de signe d'appel-quelle est la proportion d'anomalies que l'on découvre?

Quand ma nièce est tombée malade et a été hospitalisée au milieu des années 80 (avant Tchernobyl), à l'âge de 15 ans, on a mis presque un an à découvrir que c'était un problème de thyroïde; c'était si rare chez une personne jeune que les médecins hospitaliers du CHU n'avaient pas pensé à chercher de ce côté-là et à faire un dosage hormonal. Pour eux, les problèmes de thyroïde ne se rencontraient que chez des personnes de plus de 40 ou 50 ans... C'est ce qu'ils nous avaient dit alors.
J'en profite pour ajouter que l'ablation de la thyroïde vous complique ensuite singulièrement votre vie de femme! Ce n'est pas simplement "hop on retire et ensuite tout va bien!". Votre métabolisme est totalement déséquilibré et retrouver un équilibre hormonal est long et difficile. Quant à avoir des enfants...

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
AimelleB
Trapéziste
Trapéziste



MessageSujet: Re: Impact sanitaire   Mar 4 Oct 2011 - 23:40

D'après Wikipédia, épidémiologie des troubles de la thyroïde:
- hypothyroidie: Son incidence est de 0.3% chez la femme et sa prévalence est de près de 3% de la population
- hyperthyroidie: L'incidence annuelle est de 0.6 pour 1000 femmes. Elle est quatre fois moindre chez les hommes
En principe, dans un cas comme dans l'autre, uniquement chez l'adulte.

Chez ces enfants: 10 cas sur 130 représentent à peu près 7 %, ce qui semble beaucoup, surtout chez des enfants!
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Invité
Invité



MessageSujet: Re: Impact sanitaire   Mer 5 Oct 2011 - 7:34


AimelleB a écrit:


Quand ma nièce est tombée malade et a été hospitalisée au milieu des années 80 (avant Tchernobyl), à l'âge de 15 ans, on a mis presque un an à découvrir que c'était un problème de thyroïde; c'était si rare chez une personne jeune que les médecins hospitaliers du CHU n'avaient pas pensé à chercher de ce côté-là et à faire un dosage hormonal. Pour eux, les problèmes de thyroïde ne se rencontraient que chez des personnes de plus de 40 ou 50 ans... C'est ce qu'ils nous avaient dit alors.



Quelques réflexions :

- l'hypothyroïdie fruste est encore fréquente dans notre pays et particulièrement dans certaines régions car la complémentation en iode de l'alimentation n'est pas la règle (voir le sel de cuisine LIDL par exemple). D'où la fréquence des petits nodules, goître...
- Cette fréquence ne justifie pas leur recherche (± systématique) qui n'est pas recommandée (HAS)...
- Cette recherche est pourtant réalisée avec tout autant d'énergie que les autres bilans de "précaution" à la mode (ça fait tourner le petit commerce)
- Tout ceci n'enlève rien à l'opacité des "enquêtes épidémiologiques" officiellement censées assurer le suivi des irradiations intempestives

Une question : quel service de quel CHU de quelle région ?

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
AimelleB
Trapéziste
Trapéziste



MessageSujet: Re: Impact sanitaire   Mer 5 Oct 2011 - 16:53

Compiègne, je crois...
pas de pbs d'iode dans notre région
2 opérations et une ablation complète
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Invité
Invité



MessageSujet: Re: Impact sanitaire   Sam 26 Nov 2011 - 10:38

Bonjour tout le monde,

je pense malheureusement que ce fil, c'est notre avenir... Enfin bon. Une première tentative de repérage des études médicales post-Fuku m'a fait tomber là-dessus

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/238008.php

l'article, intitulé "Radiation Levels In Fukushima Relatively Safe, According To Study", explique qu'une étude publiée le 16 novembre dans le journal numérique PLoS One (Public Library of Science One) conclut que seulement dix de 5000 personnes étudiées avaient été exposées à des niveaux de radiation élevés, et que les radiations à l'intérieur des maisons ("indoor") étaient inférieures d'un facteur 10 aux radiations extérieures.

Attendez, c'est là que ça devient drôle.

Je vais voir l'article en question:
http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0027761

le titre: "Individual Radiation Exposure Dose Due to Support Activities at Safe Shelters in Fukushima Prefecture"
Oui, vous avez bien lu: l'article mesure uniquement l'exposition aux radiations des équipes envoyées par l'université Hirosaki dans la région de Fukushima -et revenues ensuite à l'université.

L'article contient bien une ligne disant que sur les 5000 personnes dont l'équipe a mesuré la contamination EXTERNE (traduire: passer un compteur sous les bras...), 10 avaient une radiactivité comprise entre 13 et 100 kcpm donc "ne demandant pas de décontamination". Et une autre ligne signale que l'ait mesuré dans les abris était 10 fois moins radioactif qu'à l'extérieur. Mais le titre du site "medicalnews" est mensonger, pour le dire platement.

Je sens que je n'ai pas fini de faire de la critique de texte... un truc sympa, c'est que la prose médicale (que je découvre) donne ses conclusions dès le début (les médecins ont généralement pas de temps à perdre...) en langage relativement clair, et qu'on peut au moins voir si la cohérence interne est respectée. J'avais eu plus de mal avec le coeff k du corium...

PG
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Invité
Invité



MessageSujet: Re: Impact sanitaire   Sam 26 Nov 2011 - 10:45

PS: le seul autre article de la semaine à ma connaissance sur ce sujet est celui d'AP analysé p. 57 du fil informations, avec nos amis Mettner, Wakefield et autres fans du Sv pour tous.

PG
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
jsp
Acrobate
Acrobate



MessageSujet: Re: Impact sanitaire   Sam 26 Nov 2011 - 12:47

oui, quand on peut, toujours remonter à l'article source.... Very Happy
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
jsp
Acrobate
Acrobate



MessageSujet: Re: Impact sanitaire   Dim 27 Nov 2011 - 19:21

résumé de l'article de Plosone

L'université de Hirosaki, située à 350 km au nord de Fukushima, a dépêché 13 équipes totalisant une centaine de personnes entre le 15 mars et le 20 juin 2011 près de Fukushima.
La première équipe mesura les doses sur les parkings le long du trajet, qui allaient en augmentant en s'approchant de Fukushima.
Les équipes ont aussi mesuré les doses externes de 5000 résidents (plusieurs centaines de résidents ont été surveillés par chaque équipe) et les doses de l'air extérieur et de l'air intérieur des abris de sécurité.
Résultats
Sur les 5000 résidents testés une dizaine avait des résultats élevés mais inférieurs à 100000 coups par minute.
L'air intérieur des abris était environ dix fois moins contaminé que l'air extérieur.
Le personnel de chaque équipe, qui restait sur place environ 4 jours, a été contrôlé, la première équipe a reçu plus que les autres. A partir de la quatrième équipe arrivée sur place fin mars les résultats sont peu différents.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Invité
Invité



MessageSujet: Re: Impact sanitaire   Dim 27 Nov 2011 - 20:32

Merci jsp. Attention, ça c'est l'abstract: le contenu précise que l'étude porte bien sur l'exposition totale des équipes elles-mêmes, et n'a rien à voir avec les 5000 réfugiés mesurés Il n'y a rien par exemple sur le lieu d'origine de ces 5000 réfugiés, où ils ont été mesurés, quand, etc. Les mesures d'air ambiant ont aussi été faites pour calculer la dose reçue par l'équipe elle-me^me, pas par les réfugiés. L'article est d'ailleurs très court, et vite lu.

La phrase clé est la suivante: This report summarizes the results of the exposure of 13 individual teams from March 15 to June 20

Attention, le lien vers medicalnews today ne marche plus: l'éditeur, à qui j'avais écris, m'a répondu qu'il l'avait retiré, qu'il 'était effectivement basé sur l'abstract, et qu'il avait demandé des explications à PlosOne.

Oilà...

PG
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
jsp
Acrobate
Acrobate



MessageSujet: Re: Impact sanitaire   Dim 27 Nov 2011 - 20:46

Le titre de l'article est bancal, le corps de l'article parlant à la fois de la mission des équipes (mesures de l'air et des résidents ) et du degré de contamination des équipes, donc à mon avis "torts partagés".
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Invité
Invité



MessageSujet: Re: Impact sanitaire   Dim 27 Nov 2011 - 22:07

Rebonsoir,

bon, du coup j'ai relu l'article, et en y réfléchissant j'ai l'impression que même le fait que les 5000 réfugiés "surveyed", ie examinés, sont cités vient de l'étude des sources de contamination possible pour les équipes médicales. En d'autre termes, ils disent seulement que les équipes médicales n'ont pas pu être exposées à une radioactivité venant des réfugiés eux-mêmes, car ceux-ci présentaient une contamination externe (de surface) relativement négligeable!
Comme la radioactivité de l'air ambiant, la radioactivité externe des réfugiés est examinée seulement pour éliminer une source possible de contamination pour l'équipe. D'où l'absence de données précises, ce n'est pas le sujet.

En revanche, la radioactivité ambiante est mesurée au départ d'Hirosaki, et tout le long du chemin jusqu'à Fukushima et retour. Les équipes étaient dotées de dosimètres personnels, et ont ensuite passé un examen via un "whole body counter" (aucune idée de ce que c'est.

Tout ce qu'on peut tirer de l'article, c'est qu'aux endroits où les équipes ont travaillé la contamination de l'air était dix fois moindre dans l'abri qu'à l'extérieur, et que les 5000 réfugiés mesurés ponctuellement par ces équipes-là ne présentaient pas de niveau de contamination externe supérieure à 100 kcpm, et à peu près pas de contamination externe supérieure à 13 kcpm, tout ça mesuré en passant un compteur sur la personne, façon aéroport. Ca ne dit rien sur les doses cumulées desdits réfugiés, ça précise juste ce qu'on trouvait sur leur vêtement quand ils arrivaient à l'abri...

On peut peut-être tirer d'un des graphiques une vague idée de la dose externe, mesurée par dosimètre, de quelqu'un restant sur place quelques jours (Figure 2), mais comme les données brutes ne sont pas fournies, ni d'ailleurs les lieux d'exposition qui varient ("various locations in Fukushima prefecture"), c'est très approximatif. Seule la 1e équipe est un peu mieux située, à 20 km de la centrale: pour cette 1e équipe ça tourne entre 50 et 100 µSv mesurés sur les dosimètres externes pour environ 4 jours, pour les équipes suivantes plutôt de 15 à 20 µSv pour une durée semblable mais on a pas les lieux, donc...

Voilà. Quand même, je trouve pour ma part que le titre promet beaucoup plus qu'il ne tient! D'où ma déception... Mad

PG
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Invité
Invité



MessageSujet: Re: Impact sanitaire   Dim 27 Nov 2011 - 23:26

Bonjour Pierre,

Je crois que tu peux traduire "whole body counter" par anthropogammamètre, soit un appareil permettant d'évaluer la radioactivité interne sur l'ensemble du corps.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
Impact sanitaire
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 22 sur 25Aller à la page : Précédent  1 ... 12 ... 21, 22, 23, 24, 25  Suivant
 Sujets similaires
-
» Arrêter de tirer son lait : quel impact sur le production de lait
» Famille 0 impact
» Impact de météorite filmé sur la lune
» Ingénieur sécurité sanitaire
» Résultats du contrôle sanitaire de la qualité de l’eau potable

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
Forum technique de RadioProtection Cirkus :: Coin-café, buvette et vente de bonbons :: Débats et decryptage de l'actualité :: Spécial Japon-
Sauter vers: